Dramatic Rise in Kids’ Food and Skin Allergies Puzzles Conventional Medicine

childhood allergiesA new study from the Centers for Disease Control has determined that food and skin allergies among children have dramatically increased over the past decade. Conventional medicine has no idea what is causing this nearly epidemic rise in allergies.

The research was produced by researchers from the CDC and funded by the National Center for Health Statistics and the U.S. Department of Health and Human services.

The researchers conducted personal phone surveys from a representative population of thousands of parents between 2009 and 2011. This was matched with a similar survey performed between 1997 and 1999 with the same research methods. The survey was conducted with parents or responsible adults, who answered questions regarding their children to the interviewers. The survey collected data on children between the ages of infancy through 17 years of age.

The research found that 5.1% of all children have food allergies. This converts to about one in twenty children.

The 1997-1999 survey found that 3.4% of children had food allergies, or about one in thirty children.

This computes to a growth rate of 50% – meaning 50% more U.S. children have food allergies than a decade earlier.

Learn about natural solutions for food allergies.

The researchers also found that skin allergies increased during the same period – from 7.4% of children in 1997-1999 to 12.5% of children in 2009-2011.

That equates to a growth rate of nearly 70% for skin allergies during the decade. And it means that one out of every eight children have skin allergies.

The study also found that the most common type of allergies among American children were respiratory allergies. Approximately 17% of children have respiratory allergies – equating to nearly 1 out of 5 children.

Learn about natural solutions for hay fever and other respiratory allergies.

However, there was no significant rise in respiratory allergies during the decade. As Realnatural reported on yesterday, if we factor in the fact that emissions have been reduced by nearly 7% in the U.S. since 2005, this means that respiratory allergies are in fact rising against the backdrop of lower emissions.

The CDC researchers, led by senior author Dr. Lara Akinbami, were puzzled with the findings. “We don’t really have the answer,” Dr. Akinbami said when asked her opinion on the cause for the dramatic rise in allergies among children.

The research also found that younger children have a higher incidence of skin allergies while older kids have more respiratory allergies. Incidence of skin allergies is over 14% in four year-olds and younger; 13% between five years and nine years old; and 11% between the ages of 10 and 17 years old.

Hispanic children have significantly lower rates of both food and skin allergies, at 3.6% and 10% respectively. Meanwhile, Black children have significantly higher rates of skin allergies, at over 17%, but lower rates of respiratory allergies than Whites, at 15.6%. Among White children only, 12% have skin allergies and over 19% have respiratory allergies.

The research also discovered that the higher the family income, the more incidence of allergies among the children in the family. In families below the poverty level, 4.4% have food allergies and 15% have respiratory allergies. Among families with income over the poverty level, 5% have food allergies and 15.8% have respiratory allergies. And in children in families with income more than double the poverty level, 5.4% have food allergies and 18.3% have respiratory allergies.

That means that children in significantly-higher income families have over 20% more food allergies and respiratory allergies than do children in families below the poverty level.

Conventional medical researchers are puzzled not only with this, but by the dramatic rise in food and skin allergies among children: They are also mystified as to the causes of these allergies in general.

This does not mean those causes are unknown.

Find the real causes for food allergies.

Find the real causes for hay fever and other respiratory allergies.

Written by Case Adams, Naturopath

REFERENCE:

Jackson KD, LeJeana DH, Akinbami LJ. Trends in Allergic Conditions Among Children. HCHS Data Brief, Natl Ctr for Health Stats. No. 121, May 2013

Case Adams is a California Naturopath with a PhD in Natural Health Sciences, and Board Certified Alternative Medicine Practitioner. He has authored 26 books on natural healing strategies. “My journey into writing about alternative medicine began about 9:30 one evening after I finished with a patient at the clinic I practiced at over a decade ago. I had just spent the last two hours explaining how diet, sleep and other lifestyle choices create health problems and how changes in these, along with certain herbal medicines and other natural strategies can radically yet safely turn ones health around. As I drove home that night, I realized I needed to get this knowledge out to more people. So I began writing about health with a mission to reach those who desperately need this information. The strategies in my books and articles are backed by scientific evidence along with wisdom handed down through traditional medicines for thousands of years.” Case connects with the elements by surfing, hiking and being a beach bum.

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