Lack of Sun Linked to Trauma Cases

(Last Updated On: June 12, 2018)

vitamin D and traumaNew Research presented at the 2012 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons has linked orthopaedic trauma cases to vitamin D deficiency.

The research was conducted at the University of Missouri hospital Level 1 trauma center. The researchers analyzed the medical reports for 1,830 patients between January 2009 and September 2010.

They found that 77 percent of the trauma patients had low or deficient levels of vitamin D – the vitamin produced by the body from sun exposure.

Blood vitamin D levels less than 20 ng/mL were considered deficient in the research, and between 20 and 32 ng/mL was considered insufficient. Healthy levels are considered to be between 40 and 70 ng/mL.

The research found that 39% of all the trauma patients were vitamin D deficient, while 38% percent had insufficient levels. Those patients aged between 18 to 25 had the lowest vitamin D levels, with 29% being deficient and 55% insufficient.

The research was led by Brett D. Crist, MD, co-director of the Orthopaedic Trauma Service and Department of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Missouri. Dr. Crist commented, “Vitamin D deficiency affects patients of all ages and is more prevalent than we thought it was. Vitamin D deficiency has been linked to increased incidences of fracture nonunions (bone breaks that fail to heal).”

Sunshine produces the healthiest form of vitamin D. Food sources for vitamin D are typically too low to provide adequate levels. Supplementation is usually recommended for those who don’t get enough sunshine.

Find out more about how sunshine heals.

Case Adams, PhD

Case Adams has a Ph.D. in Natural Health Sciences, is a California Naturopath and is Board Certified as an Alternative Medicine Practitioner, with clinical experience and diplomas in Aromatherapy, Bach Flower Remedies, Blood Chemistry, Clinical Nutritional Counseling, Homeopathy and Colon Hydrotherapy. He has authored 27 books and numerous articles on print and online magazines. Contact: case@caseadams.com

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